Thursday, April 04, 2019

Poetry Friday: I'm hosting!




Why we write, why we read, and why poetry exists ...
All neatly answered in one short, perfect piece by John Ashbery. 

(I could use a day alone with my madness and favorite flower. 
Wishing you the same.) 

Share your links, please, by way of the ever-helpful Mr. Linky! 


Late Echo
by John Ashbery 

Alone with our madness and favorite flower
We see that there really is nothing left to write about.
Or rather, it is necessary to write about the same old things
In the same way, repeating the same things over and over
For love to continue and be gradually different.

(Read the rest here, at the Poetry Foundation.)





35 comments:

  1. I had to look up "saraband" -- isn't that a lovely description: "For it to get slowed down to the pace of an authentic/Saraband and huddle there, alive and resting."
    Thanks for hosting, Karen!

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  2. I like John Ashbery's poem because it's timeless, and he has shown us how even more chaotic our lives are today, and how we still need to re-examine everyday things and hold beauty close. I like this new word, "Saraband," I had to look it up too
    Thanks for hosting the roundup Karen!

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  3. Lovely poem, I really need to read more of Ashberry's work! I join Michelle and Tabatha in my love for "saraband." Sigh.

    Thanks for hosting!!

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  4. I agree, the poem is lovely and timeless! Thank you for sharing it today.

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  5. Oh my goodness, Karen. I am taking a little writing retreat next week in a beautiful spot, and I hope to enjoy a few slow days with just my madness and a flower (or, because I'll be in central Northern Minnesota--perhaps favorite snowflake!). Thank you for this!

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  6. Perhaps we all will learn a new word today, Karen. How wonderful that Ashbery takes us to a different place in his poem's musing. It's wonderful. I love "and the color of the day put in". Thank you for hosting this first Poetry Friday of April!

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  7. Oh my goodness, what a fabulous poem! I'll be back with my link later.

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  8. These lines, in particular, resonated with me:
    "Or rather, it is necessary to write about the same old things
    In the same way, repeating the same things over and over
    For love to continue and be gradually different."
    I notice the need to revisit the same things in my thoughts, my writing, and my photography. Thank you for sharing this lovely poem.

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  9. Huh! Saraband....I never knew of this word. What a beautiful way to say, "dance" without using that word. I must go find a way to use this word in some writing. I love it. Thanks for hosting this week! Enjoy all the postings.

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  10. This poem made me think about the subjects of my poetry that I tackle over and over again and how many different ways there are to say the exact same thing. There is beauty in all of it though, and like Ashbury infers, each is loved in its own and different way.

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  11. I think what's interesting is that different people write about things different ways.

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  12. This is what I love about poetry: telling us something we all know, but saying it in such a way as to make it seem like we never thought about it before. Thoughtful and powerful.

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  13. Karen, the poem you shared is one that moves me. I am rereading it several times because it fits so well with my train of thought tonight. I am blending both my Spiritual Journey Frist Thursday and Poetry Friday posts due to acute sinusitis and my professional development commitments. Thank you for thoughtful post and for being our charming host.

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  14. I too find myself going back to the same subjects over and over again, examining and reexamining. Thanks for hosting and for teaching me the word saraband!

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  15. Thank you so much for hosting this week! :)

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  16. I LOVE this poem! Madness and a favorite flower. Oh, yes. Thank you, Linda!

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  17. What a great poem! The title alone was enough to make me swoon, and then the first and last lines...perfection! Thank you for hosting, Karen!

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  18. I so needed this poem. Thank you, Karen! And thank you for hosting too! xx

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  19. Thank you for hosting Karen. The short intro poem you shared resonated strongly. It demonstrated the power of words used succinctly.

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  20. Love the poem and it’s themes of regeneration for something old to be made new. If I were to name my favorite line, I’d need to list the entire poem. Thank you for hosting and sharing the poem. I’m going to share it w/ my AP Lit students. They will love it. Of course we’ll look up “saraband”!

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  21. Thanks for hosting, Karen! You picked a poem that clearly resonates with all of us! It's amazing to me that in 1979, Asbury was already asking us to think about "the chronic inattention/Of our lives." What would he think about us now?!?

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  22. Hi Karen! Happy NPM and thank you for hosting! The poem you shared struck a chord with me too. My quest to inform that "unprepared knowledge" of myself is ongoing, for sure.

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  23. PS. I somehow got my link up on Mr. Linky twice. If you are able to delete the second one, I'd appreciate it!

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  24. Trying to think: what is my favorite flower? How does one choose? I love so many -- all, really... do I have to have a favorite? What luxury to angst over such a thing... thank you so much for hosting and for this poem. Happy NPM! xo

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  25. "it is necessary to write about the same old things
    In the same way,"
    Love these words from the poem your shared, Karen. Thanks for hosting

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  26. Thank you for hosting today, Karen. This poem is sublime in its simplicity and truth. Thank you for introducing it to me!

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  27. Thank you for that John Ashberry poem! I too love that line: "I could use a day alone with my madness and favorite flower."

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  28. Oh, lovely - saraband is a word which is itself a poem.

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  29. So happy to see that this poem resonates with so many, and it's fitting that it resonates in different, yet similar, ways. :)

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  30. This poem works for me on many levels. My partner (my favourite flower) and I just celebrated our 42nd anniversary. I love how authentic saraband fits for the early days of our marriage, and the more comfortable place we are now at.

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  31. I loved the "chronic inattention" part. It is so true. Thank you for hosting!

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  32. "We see that there really is nothing left to write about.
    Or rather, it is necessary to write about the same old things."

    Thank you for sharing this poem. These are my favorite lines. I am constantly fascinated by how often we revisit the same topics, yet each writing seems to find a new truth. Much to consider.

    Thanks for hosting, Karen.

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  33. I really enjoyed this poem--thanks for sharing it. It's so true that we write about the same things over and over. But that's how we see old things in new ways--at least that's one way.
    Thanks for hosting, too.

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  34. I'd love some time alone with my madness and favorite flowers! Terrific choice for this week. Many thanks for hosting, Karen. Cheers!

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  35. Hi, Karen--I'm fascinated by the short line "and the color of the day put in," which sounds like entering data into a program or spreadsheet (probably moreso to someone who spent a LOT of time this week "putting in" grades). It counteracts a certain suggestion to lie back and let it flow over you, demands more investment--which, I guess, is the writing part. Thanks for hosting.

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