Monday, February 01, 2010

Celebrating Our Catholic School

If you're Catholic ...

and if you homeschool ...

you're

A Catholic School!  So, celebrate!

You are doing everything you can do to give your child an authentic Catholic education. That's worth celebrating during this Catholic Schools Week.

Personally, I always think chocolate should be involved, but follow your own instincts. Our celebrations will also include chocolate chip cookies. Cookies are a necessity for any good Catholic school. And coffee. Teachers need coffee, so don't be shy about consuming gallons of it this week in the name of outstanding teaching.

What are you doing for Catholic Schools Week?  I'm looking for some new ideas (not that chocolate and coffee ever get old ....)

(Custom image thanks to ImageChef.com)

10 comments:

notjustlaura said...

I only have myself to teach but (entirely co-incidentally!) I've just started to study again today ...

TJ D'Agostino - Catholic School Advocate said...

Thanks, Karen, for your blog post celebrating Catholic schools week and your vocation as a Catholic educator. Keep traditional Catholic schools in your thoughts and prayers these days as well, for they need them! The current economy has been tough for committed parents that wish to send their children to Catholic schools, and as a Catholic community, we will need to do more to preserve this important apostolic of the Church. Home Catholic schooling is wonderful, but so are our traditional Catholic schools, and they are under duress. Visit my blog to learn more about it.

Anonymous said...

T.J. D'Agostino, I personally am celebrating Catholic schools week with a glass of wine and a scowl. It's been two years of homeschooling in this household since my "Catholic" school's Protestant undertones became unbearable in an attempt by our principal and pastor to "get the numbers up." Their changes included a pet Mass with dog biscuits for St. Francis of Assisi's feast day, a new, touchy/feely religion curriculum minus any memorization, and cuts in the number of days per week the kids go to Mass. I was a rabid Catholic school supporter for the seven years (I personally went to public school). One of the primary problems with Catholic schools today is they have to recruit because Catholics are having fewer babies. And frankly, parents think they can run the schools. Christ runs the schools. So without Christ coming first, the schools are failing. Homeschoolers don't attempt to do what so many schools are failing because we think it's fun. I personally have to do this by default. But thanks for the reminder.

Faith said...

Where I live, in the Arlington diocese, they are building new schools and there are also many, many Catholic homeschoolers. So things are pretty successful around these here parts! I do think homeschoolers and Catholic schoolers ought to live in peace!

And Anonymous, it was pretty shoddy of you not to leave your name. I homeschool because I find it a joyful experience so please do not paint all Catholic homeschoolers as bitter ex-Catholic schoolers who are antagonistic towards Catholic schools. It is not the case. I am a product of 16 years of Catholic education (K through College). While I know that Catholic schools are not perfect (believe me, I went to them during the 70's!)there is much to admire about them. I will certainly pray for their continued success and vitality.

Karen, I haven't thought up anyway to celebrate being a Catholic school. I'll have to consult the kids on this one.

Roxane B. Salonen said...

Karen, I'll be signing up my fifth and youngest child for kindergarten in our Catholic schools. They typically have cookies, coffee and even a few chocolates on hand during this open house event. So it sounds like we're on a similar wavelength, except that you can have seconds without feeling the slightest bit of guilt. Enjoy and indulge. :) I have really felt happy with our experience in Catholic schools so am all about promoting them, whether traditionally or in the home. :)

Anonymous said...

Faith,

While you have a right to leave your name here, I also have the right to remain anonymous with regard to my situation in my particular SMALL community, which you know nothing about. I certainly am not of the opinion that most Catholic homeschoolers are disgruntled with Catholic schools. On the contrary. But my voice is just as important in this discussion, and it is rarely heard, because most homeschoolers typically choose this route before placing their children in school and going through the current-day situation I just described. I salute you, and you should be (and obviously are) proud. And if I didn't support Catholic schools in a sense, I never would have placed my children in them to begin with. I also am open to placing my children back in a decent Catholic school should one open in our area, which is known nationwide for being predominantly Protestant and for having very poor Catholic schools.

Faith said...

Anonymous, pardon my hasty words. Perhaps you are not aware of internet etiquette. When you leave an angry post and keep yourself anonymous it is usually perceived in a poor light. If for some reason you feel you will be persecuted because someone in your small community might chance on this blog and see your name and then persecute you in some way for that, you have the perfect right to remain anonymous. However, it might be a good thing to mention that you are afraid to sign your name. Then folks would not be inclined to read more into it than you intended.

One way Catholic schools can get better is for those who want them to remain faithful to the Magisterium to speak up firmly, strongly and in charity. I think your voice should be heard but perhaps you might want to make TJ D'Agostino your ally in correcting the situation in your community rather than resorting to wine and scowls when he talks about supporting Catholic schools.

Also you did say in your first post that, and I quote: "Homeschoolers don't attempt to do what so many schools are failing because we think it is fun." So I interpreted that as you asserting that Catholics homeschool because we reject our poor Catholic schools. I homeschool because I love the homeschooling lifestyle and being so close to my children. There are many Catholics, likewise, who homeschool for that reason as well. Now if you had said "Some homeschoolers don't attempt what Catholic schools are failing. . ." but you did clarify that in your later post. I am glad you realize not all Catholic homeschoolers do it in reaction to poor schools. But I think my apparent misinterpretation of your words is not without some basis!

Anyway, I hope the situation in your community improves and if it doesn't I hope you come to find out how wonderful homeschooling can be! Patience gains all things!

Tertium Quid said...

I just blogged on our homeschooling program, now that we are five months into it.

Ora et labora.

http://burketokirk.blogspot.com/2010/01/homeschooling-for-five-months.html

Anonymous said...

Faith,

Enjoy your Catholic schools week. By "small community," I meant my narrow-minded homeschooling community that frequents this blog. Keep it up. You've won me over even more to your way of life.

Karen E. said...

Thanks, everyone for your comments. I salute both Catholic homeschooling, and the many good Catholic schools out there. I really believe that homeschooling has been a gift to our family, but I don't necessarily believe it is best for all people in all situations. I can also understand that there is frustration in some areas with Catholic schools that offer a less-than-Catholic identity -- but you're all welcome to discuss here.

Roxane, I say indulge in the seconds. :) And, TQ -- your first five months of hs'ing sound fascinating and quite full!

Thanks, all, for stopping by.